Engeering Horizon

NEW GREEN HOUSE GAS (GHG) REPORTING RULE

NEW GREEN HOUSE GAS (GHG) REPORTING RULE

July 13
20:56 2014

In 2011, a new rule from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (40 CFR Part 98) came into effect
requiring certain fossil fuel suppliers, industrial gas suppliers, manufacturers of vehicles and engines outside
of the light‐duty sector and certain downstream facilities that emit greenhouse gases to submit annual
reports to the EPA. Companies affected are primarily large facilities emitting 25,000 metric tons of carbon
dioxide equivalent (mtCO2e) or more of GHG emissions per year.
The GHG’s covered are carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O), hydrofluorocarbons (HFC),
perfluorochemicals (PFC), and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), as well as other fluorinated gases (e.g., nitrogen
trifluoride and hydrofluorinated ethers). These gases are often expressed in metric tons of carbon dioxide
equivalent (mtCO2e). The 25,000 mtCO2e limit was chosen because it is estimated that 80% of the CO2
emitted comes from the 10,000 or so facilities that emit that much or more. 25,000 mtCO2e is equivalent to
the annual greenhouse gas emissions from approximately 4,600 passenger vehicles consuming over 58,000
barrels of oil. In other words, these are big industrial facilities. 80% of the 10,000 facilities that will be affected
are from the following categories:
• Big combustion boilers/kilns/heaters (more than 30 million BTU’s): 3,000
• Landfills: 2,551
• Natural gas plants: 1,502
• Electrical generating stations: 1,108
• The rest (2,000 or so) are paper mills, auto plants, refineries, bulk gas companies, steel plants and other
metal production plants
On the other hand, due to the growing demand for renewable energy sources, manufacturing of solar cells
and photovoltaic arrays have advanced dramatically in recent years, , to compensate for the GHG affect. Solar
photovoltaics are arrays of cells containing a material that converts solar radiation into volts, creating direct
current electricity. With the rising cost of electricity from fossil fuels, solar thermal energy (STE) currently
leads the way as the most cost‐effective solar technology. Major solar thermal power industry players are
striving to make the economics of solar power a mainstream renewable energy source. While only 600
megawatts of solar thermal power was up and running worldwide in October 2009, another 400 megawatts is
under construction and there are 14,000 megawatts of similar solar thermal projects being developed.

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Engineering Horizons

Engineering Horizons

“Engineering Horizons” is the first & leading technical magazine of Pakistan covering Process, Mechanical, Metallurgical, Mining, Electrical & Electronics field under a single cover. We also feel pleasure in saying that this is the only magazine of its own kind & style, which is widely circulated in all Engineering Sectors of Pakistan.

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